Tickets are now on sale for Wine Riot Tour 2014. We’re hitting New York, Boston, Chicago, and Los Angeles TWICE this year!
We have both spring and fall events on the books bringing hundreds of wines from around the world, Crash Course seminars, wine education, our Bubbly Bar, the Wine 101 booth, and of course, our photo booth, two times.Use promo code: 2014FTW to get an additional $5 off the already discounted tickets making them only $50. Get in there!This “You are Totally Awesome” special discount last until January 2, 2014. We picked this date because we wanted to give you an extra day to fend off that New Years Eve hangover on January 1. You’re welcome!Buy tickets:
April 4-5 in NYCApril 18-19 in BostonMay 2-3 in ChicagoMay 9-10 in LASept 19-20 in NYCOct 17-18 in ChicagoOct 24-25 in BostonNov 14-15 in LA

Tickets are now on sale for Wine Riot Tour 2014. We’re hitting New York, Boston, Chicago, and Los Angeles TWICE this year!

We have both spring and fall events on the books bringing hundreds of wines from around the world, Crash Course seminars, wine education, our Bubbly Bar, the Wine 101 booth, and of course, our photo booth, two times.

Use promo code: 2014FTW to get an additional $5 off the already discounted tickets making them only $50. Get in there!

This “You are Totally Awesome” special discount last until January 2, 2014. We picked this date because we wanted to give you an extra day to fend off that New Years Eve hangover on January 1. You’re welcome!

Buy tickets:

April 4-5 in NYC
April 18-19 in Boston
May 2-3 in Chicago
May 9-10 in LA
Sept 19-20 in NYC
Oct 17-18 in Chicago
Oct 24-25 in Boston
Nov 14-15 in LA

Dear Washington DC,

We love you a lot, we really do. You are so enthusiastic about Wine Riot it hurts us to not have a date on the 2014 tour calendar. The truth is, we’ve been hosting Wine Riot in Washington DC for three years in a row and we just can’t make it financially viable. That means we’re back to the drawing board. There are a few factors at play, and I want to take the time to explain them.

Venue Size: We love the venue we used in 2013 but the fact of the matter is even if we sell it out, we just break even. That’s a big risk for us to take. We’re a small company, run by two entrepreneurs that started this thing out of our apartment back in 2006. The risk is big enough that it would seriously hinder my personal ability to pay rent for the year. Which totally sucks.
Marketing: Our model doesn’t work in DC. We kill it in New York, Boston, Chicago, and even LA, but our Facebook heavy marketing approach clashes with the low percentage of DC folks that are not on the service. Yeah, we could adapt, and try new approach just for DC but that takes a larger investment, and unfortunately, due to the above venue size problem, we just can’t repay the extra expense.

Wineries: Our event succeeds in cities that sales and marketing representatives for US based and international wineries live. New York and Boston are big cities but for DC, most of the reps live in New York and they need to travel to DC to pour. This is a problem because it costs them a lot more money. They’re willing to make the trip, but scheduling is often a major issue.

All in all, we have decided to pass on a Washington DC Wine Riot in 2014 and you have no idea how much that bums us out, but know that it does not mean you are out for good. Those of you that have attended are probably the most excited of all the Wine Riot attendees in the US.

We’re not giving up, we just need to figure out a different business model. We have some ideas and we’re working on it.

Keep drinking more wine and we’ll hopefully be back soon!

Sincerely,

Tyler Balliet
President, Co-Founder
Second Glass

Dear Washington DC,


We love you a lot, we really do. You are so enthusiastic about Wine Riot it hurts us to not have a date on the 2014 tour calendar. The truth is, we’ve been hosting Wine Riot in Washington DC for three years in a row and we just can’t make it financially viable. That means we’re back to the drawing board. There are a few factors at play, and I want to take the time to explain them.

Venue Size: We love the venue we used in 2013 but the fact of the matter is even if we sell it out, we just break even. That’s a big risk for us to take. We’re a small company, run by two entrepreneurs that started this thing out of our apartment back in 2006. The risk is big enough that it would seriously hinder my personal ability to pay rent for the year. Which totally sucks.

Marketing: Our model doesn’t work in DC. We kill it in New York, Boston, Chicago, and even LA, but our Facebook heavy marketing approach clashes with the low percentage of DC folks that are not on the service. Yeah, we could adapt, and try new approach just for DC but that takes a larger investment, and unfortunately, due to the above venue size problem, we just can’t repay the extra expense.

Wineries: Our event succeeds in cities that sales and marketing representatives for US based and international wineries live. New York and Boston are big cities but for DC, most of the reps live in New York and they need to travel to DC to pour. This is a problem because it costs them a lot more money. They’re willing to make the trip, but scheduling is often a major issue.

All in all, we have decided to pass on a Washington DC Wine Riot in 2014 and you have no idea how much that bums us out, but know that it does not mean you are out for good. Those of you that have attended are probably the most excited of all the Wine Riot attendees in the US.

We’re not giving up, we just need to figure out a different business model. We have some ideas and we’re working on it.

Keep drinking more wine and we’ll hopefully be back soon!

Sincerely,

Tyler Balliet

President, Co-Founder

Second Glass

Dear San Francisco,

We’re bummed to be passing on a Wine Riot in San Francisco for 2014. To be completely honest, it’s just not financially viable for us. While we sell 3,600 tickets to events in New York (sold out) and 2,600 tickets in Boston (sold out), we were coming in at less than 1,500 (less than 50% capacity) in San Francisco for two years in a row. We’re not a big company and we have to put our money and time where we can get it back. We haven’t given up on San Francisco but we do need a new style of event and business model to make it work. I wanted to take some time to explain the factors.
Snow Cones in a Blizzard: There are hundreds of wine events, large and small, in San Francisco and Napa is a short drive away. While we do throw a very different event from anything else in San Francisco, its hard harder to stand out from the competition.

Venue: They are tearing down our venue and making it into condos. That kind of sucks for us since there actually are not that many large-scale venues that are easily accessible by public transportation. Making it incredibly easy for people to arrive and depart without driving is a requirement for us, so we would have to find a new place to host it.

Marketing: You guys are expensive to reach. Seriously, we pay 2-3x more per impression in San Francisco than any other city. It makes sense, there are a bajillion tech startups using their backyard for testing their products and buying up online ads left and right. However, it presents a problem for our budgeting and requires us to sell a lot more tickets.
All in all, we realize that Wine Riot may not be the right fit for San Francisco. We’re back to the drawing board and looking for new ways to bring totally awesome wine education to the Bay Area. In the meantime, you should visit your friends in Boston, Chicago, New York, or Los Angeles!

Sincerely,

Tyler Balliet
President, Co-Founder
Second Glass
 

Dear San Francisco,

We’re bummed to be passing on a Wine Riot in San Francisco for 2014. To be completely honest, it’s just not financially viable for us. While we sell 3,600 tickets to events in New York (sold out) and 2,600 tickets in Boston (sold out), we were coming in at less than 1,500 (less than 50% capacity) in San Francisco for two years in a row. We’re not a big company and we have to put our money and time where we can get it back. We haven’t given up on San Francisco but we do need a new style of event and business model to make it work. I wanted to take some time to explain the factors.

Snow Cones in a Blizzard: There are hundreds of wine events, large and small, in San Francisco and Napa is a short drive away. While we do throw a very different event from anything else in San Francisco, its hard harder to stand out from the competition.

Venue: They are tearing down our venue and making it into condos. That kind of sucks for us since there actually are not that many large-scale venues that are easily accessible by public transportation. Making it incredibly easy for people to arrive and depart without driving is a requirement for us, so we would have to find a new place to host it.

Marketing: You guys are expensive to reach. Seriously, we pay 2-3x more per impression in San Francisco than any other city. It makes sense, there are a bajillion tech startups using their backyard for testing their products and buying up online ads left and right. However, it presents a problem for our budgeting and requires us to sell a lot more tickets.

All in all, we realize that Wine Riot may not be the right fit for San Francisco. We’re back to the drawing board and looking for new ways to bring totally awesome wine education to the Bay Area. In the meantime, you should visit your friends in Boston, Chicago, New York, or Los Angeles!

Sincerely,

Tyler Balliet

President, Co-Founder

Second Glass